Can There Be Peace?

Can There Be Peace?

Nestled in Sierra Madre del Sur, below the Trans-Volcanic Cordillera ranging through the southern state of Chiapas Mexico, is the colonial town San Cristobal de las Casas. It’s existence is a tribute to the quiet struggle of this hamlet since 1528. It holds the dubious historical distinction of being the most likely city to be captured by invading forces from the south. It is surrounded by spectacular and diverse landscape. Mountains tower over the Lancandona rain forest. The town’s unique culture is preserved, in part, by it’s remoteness. Much of its sixteenth and seventeenth century architecture escaped ruin. Mayan Indian women weave brilliant clothing with designs singular to their sect. The Catholic Church makes its ostentatious presence known with a large, ornate building on the square of the town. An air conditioned opera house built by the Mexican government to appease criticism of its wretched treatment of its poorest people …

A Chiapas Decade: Zapatista Perspectives

A Chiapas Decade: Zapatista Perspectives

The beginning of the New Year for 2004 marked the tenth anniversary of the Zapatista armed revolution in Chiapas Mexico. It was in the dark, cold, early hours of 1994 that the Mayan peasant soldiers captured several towns in revolt of the oppression they had endured since Cortez wandered into Southern Mexico. Their complaints were that they were given no autonomy to preserve their culture; no political or judicial rights to fight confiscation of their land and freedom; and no fair division of government services to educate and provide medical services. They argued that their ability to provide food and shelter for their families by farming, as they had for centuries, was taken from them by domestic patronage and later international agreements. They argued that the schools, infrequently open, were more interested in convincing their children to abandon their culture than teaching them.

Their complaints continue to have outside verification.

Welcome to zapatistarevolution.com

Welcome to zapatistarevolution.com

Blake Bailey became intrigued with the Zapatista movement in 1994 when reports of the Zapatista revolution pervaded the international press in 1994. Blake began an exhaustive study of the Chiapas story leading himb to a road-trip across Mexico to San Cristabal de las Casas, where the dramatic take-over by the Mayan Indians was focused. This story of adventure and sacrifice of a people's revolution drove Blake to write a novel based on the continuing struggle in Mexico.

Our website is devoted to the cause of the Zapatistas. We invite you to visit our links, suggest a link to add to our site and purchase the book, Zapatista is faithfully based on the facts of the 1994 Chiapas Indian uprising in southern Mexico. It is designed to be interesting to anyone simply wanting to read an adventure story, as well as anyone interested in the deeper drama of a people revolution.